Last edited by Kajira
Monday, January 27, 2020 | History

4 edition of Eighteenth Century Shakespeare (Eighteenth Century Shakespeare, No. 5) found in the catalog.

Eighteenth Century Shakespeare (Eighteenth Century Shakespeare, No. 5)

Theobald

Eighteenth Century Shakespeare (Eighteenth Century Shakespeare, No. 5)

  • 257 Want to read
  • 24 Currently reading

Published by Routledge .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Reference, Information and Interdisciplinary Subjects,
  • Literary Criticism,
  • Criticism, Textual,
  • Plays / Drama,
  • Shakespeare, William,,
  • Literature: Classics,
  • Shakespeare,
  • General,
  • Literary Collections / General,
  • Shakespeare, William,
  • Criticism and interpretation,
  • 1564-1616,
  • 18th century,
  • History

  • The Physical Object
    FormatHardcover
    Number of Pages194
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL7799628M
    ISBN 10071462523X
    ISBN 109780714625232

    Of the rest, to part I have given the highest approbation, by inserting the offered reading in the text; part I have left to the judgment of the reader, as doubtful, though specious; and part I have censured without reserve, but I am sure without bitterness of malice, and, I hope, without wantonness of insult. Maxwell, ed. Shakespeare may be truly said to have introduced them both amongst us, and in some of his happier scenes to have carried them both to the utmost height. Rumbold focuses on the significance of Shakespeare quotation for the reader. The first, whoever they be, must take their sentiments and descriptions immediately from knowledge; the resemblance is therefore just, their descriptions are verified by every eye, and their sentiments acknowledged by every breast. Johnson's Preface is here reprinted from the edition ofthe last to appear in his lifetime.

    If we endured without praising, respect for the father of our drama might excuse us; but I have seen, in the book of some modern critick, a collection of anomalies which shew that he has corrupted language by every mode of depravation, but which his admirer has acc. This culture crucially provides the fertile ground for the blossoming—or weed-like profusion, depending on perspective—of Shakespeare quotation from the s onward. Samuel Johnson: Preface to Edition of Shakespeare. Shakespeare, whether life or nature be his subject, shews plainly that he has seen with his own eyes; he gives the image which he receives, not weakened or distorted by the intervention of any other mind; the ignorant feel his representations to be just, and the learned see that they are complete. A man so anxiously scrupulous might have been expected to do more, but what little he did was commonly right.

    Boyle congratulated himself upon his high birth, because it favoured his curiosity, by facilitating his access. To judge from what he says in his Preface, his project of an edition of Shakespeare might have been abandoned had not Pope persuaded him to proceed with it by the offer of making it appear their joint work. How well she was obey'd, the play it self is an admirable proof. The most influential English actor of the eighteenth century, David Garrick, could hail Shakespeare as 'the god of our idolatry', yet perform an adaptation of King Lear with a happy ending, add a dying speech to Macbeth, and remove the puns from Romeo and Juliet.


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Eighteenth Century Shakespeare book

Eighteenth Century Essays on Shakespeare - novelonlinefull. Amongst these was the incomparable Mr. Let me however do them justice. If we endured without praising, respect for the father of our drama might excuse us; but I have seen, in the book of some modern critick, a collection of anomalies which shew that he has corrupted language by every mode of depravation, but which his admirer has acc.

There is no name attached to the book, but the androcentric point of view of its contents, the interest in Latin poetry and translation, and the presence of verse connected to universities or schools lead me to imagine a male compiler.

Pope had nothing to do with it, for it was not begun till after his death. The original purpose of the Essay is indicated by the motto on the t. Isaiah Thomas in Worcester, Massachusetts, was responsible for copying many of Newbery's books and introducing them to an American audience.

But for the advice of friends it would probably have remained in ma. He speaks sometimes indefinitely of copies, when he has only one. This large volume is a welcome addition to the list, though its character may be disorienting at first. The early nineteenth century was too readily convinced by Coleridge and Hazlitt that they were the first to recognise and to explain the greatness of Shakespeare.

The Introduction has been planned to show the main lines in the development of Shakespeare's reputation, and to prove that the new criticism, which is said to begin with Coleridge, takes its rise as early as the third quarter of the eighteenth century. To this century, as much as to the nineteenth, Shakespeare was the glory of English letters.

Respect is due to high place, tenderness to living reputation, and veneration to genius and learning; but he cannot be justly offended at that liberty of which he has himself so frequently given an example, nor very solicitous what is thought of notes, which he ought never to have considered as part of his serious employments, and which, I suppose, since the ardour of composition is remitted, he no longer numbers among his happy effusions.

Pope made them acquainted with the true state of Shakespeare's text, shewed that it was extremely corrupt, and gave reason to hope that there were means of reforming it.

His exceeding candor and good nature must certainly have inclin'd all the gentler part of the world to love him, as the power of his wit oblig'd the men of the most delicate knowledge and polite learning to admire him.

Worth special mention, however, is a cumulative index to volumes 41 through 50 of Shakespeare Survey, running to more than fifty pages of small three-columned print. Richard Farmer.

The deftness with which Rumbold handles the wide net she casts offers an early indication of her book's success, displaying what her subsequent chapters also showcase: a comprehensive knowledge of her subject, a sensitivity to the dynamics of intertextuality, and a nuanced approach to the implications of cultural cross-over between literature, popular entertainment, and social practices.

We require strong evidence before we may disregard contemporary opinion, and in Theobald's case there is abundant evidence to confirm Johnson's view. The pa. Of all the publishers, clandestine or professed, their negligence and unskilfulness has by the late revisers been sufficiently shewn.

Pope's edition fell below his own expectations, and he was so much offended, when he was found to have left any thing for others to do, that he pa. ISBN Warburton had a name sufficient to confer celebrity on those who could exalt themselves into antagonists, and his notes have raised a clamour too loud to be distinct.

In the Preface to the second and enlarged edition, which appeared in the same year, Farmer says that "the few who have been pleased to controvert any part of his doctrine have favoured him with better manners than arguments.

It collects many details about eighteenth-century practice, including popular singers and their hit arias, some of which were based on Shakespearean texts, some on original material.

Hanmer apparently found that Warburton did not give him much help, and Warburton may have been annoyed at failing to find Hanmer as docile as Theobald.

Editing typically eliminates a large portion of this performative interaction. He found the measure reformed in so many pa.

Women and Shakespeare in the Eighteenth Century

The opinions prevalent in one age, as truths above the reach of controversy, are confuted and rejected in another, and rise again to reception in remoter times.Read this book on Questia.

Read the full-text online edition of Eighteenth Century Essays on Shakespeare (). Home» Browse» Books» Book details, Eighteenth Century Essays on Shakespeare.

Eighteenth Century Essays on Shakespeare Are we not still inclined to hold the verdicts of Hume and Chesterfield as representative of. Shakespeare in the Eighteenth Century explores the impact he had on various aspects of culture and society: not only in literature and the theatre, but also in visual arts, music and even national identity.

The eighteenth century's Shakespeare, however, was not our Shakespeare. Fiona Ritchie analyses the significant role played by women in the construction of Shakespeare's reputation which took place in the eighteenth century. The period's perception of Shakespeare as unlearned allowed many women to identify with him and in doing so they seized an opportunity to enter.

The purpose of this book is to give an account of Shakespeare's reputation during the eighteenth century, and to suggest that there are grounds for reconsidering the common opinion that the century did not give him his due.

He has written widely on various aspects of 18th-century English literature, bibliography, and book history, and has held research fellowships from the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the American Council of Learned Societies, and the Folger Shakespeare Library.

This article seeks to add nuance to the story of Shakespeare's canonization in the eighteenth century, a story that has hitherto neglected the part played by the period's poetic miscellanies.

Are there patterns in the form, quantity, and selection of Shakespearean texts Cited by: 1.